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Legislation, regulations and policies to control HCFCs

The following list provides a snapshot of legislation, regulations and policies used by different countries to control HCFCs. It is a reference designed for National Ozone Units in Article 5 countries that are considering new HCFC control measures in response to Decision XIX/6 of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol.

This list should be useful during the preparation of HCFC Phaseout Management Plans (HPMPs), when NOUs will be identifying and planning for such measures.

This is an evolving list so please contact us to suggest any additions.


Contents


Austria

Solvent and foam manufacturing use controls
HCFCs prohibited as of 1 January 2000 as solvents, irrespective of the system used, and for the production of any type of foamed plastic.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003

Refrigerant use
As of 1 January 2000, HCFC prohibited as a refrigerant for any application except in equipment which has been produced before 1 January 2002.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003


Australia

Legislation
The import, export and manufacture of HCFCs has been controlled since 1996 under the Commonwealth Ozone Protection and Synthetic Greenhouse Gas Management Act 1989. It also controls imports of refrigeration and air-conditioning equipment containing an HFC or HCFC refrigerant and grants the Commonwealth the power to create a nationally consistent system to control the end-uses of these harmful gases.
Source: Austrlia Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, Legislation and regulations web site Australia Department of the  Environment

Import and export
A controlled substances licence may be granted under the Act for the import and export of HCFCs. All licences to import or export of HCFCs carries a condition that the licensee must only import or export the substance from a country that has ratified the Montreal Protocol and the relevant subsequent Amendments. To help facilitate this, the Minister must maintain a Register of Montreal Protocol Countries and the substances for which those countries are to be treated as a Montreal Protocol country.
Source: Austrlia Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, Legislation and regulations web site Australia Department of the  Environment


Bulgaria

Decree
Through Ministerial Decree 254/1999 the country adopted a HCFC phase-out schedule that meets the EU schedule with a 100% phase out by 2010.
Source: Bulgarian HCFC Phase-out strategy 2003 Bulgarian HCFC Phase Out Strategy

Imports
In 1999, Bulgaria introduced a comprehensive licensing scheme for HCFCs. This scheme includes 3 different measures to identify and control HCFC usage: (1) Import quota: Every company wishing to import HCFC shall apply MoEW for a quota. Actual imported quantities shall be reported to MoEW the following year (2) Control by regional inspectorates of MoEW: The regional inspectorates of MoEW shall every March report on imported, exported, recycled and used quantities of HCFC. The data are obtained at licensed importers and registered HCFC consumers (3) Reporting by customs: The customs department report every March on imported and exported quantities.
Source: Bulgarian HCFC Phase-out strategy 2003 Bulgarian HCFC Phase Out Strategy


Canada

Act
The Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA) controls the import, manufacture, use, sale, export and certain end-uses of ozone-depleting substances (including HCFCs). Based on this Act, the Government has issued Ozone-depleting Substances Regulations, 1998 and amendments, and the Federal Halocarbon Regulations, 2003 (FHR 2003) and other policies.
Source: Environment Canada, Stratospheric Ozone TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003

Pressurised container manufacture, imports and sales
As of 7 July 1999, no person shall manufacture or import a pressurized container that contains 2 kg or less of any HCFC, with some exemptions. As of 1 January 2000, no person shall offer for sale or sell a pressurized container that contains 2 kg or less of any HCFC, with some exemptions.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003

Foam manufacture and imports
As of 7 July 1999, no person shall manufacture or import plastic foam in which any HCFC has been used as a foaming agent, except for a rigid foam product or a flexible polyurethane boardstock foam product. As of 1 January 2000, no person shall manufacture or import any flexible polyurethane boardstock foam product in which any HCFC has been used as a foaming agent.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003

Solvent manufacture, imports and sales
As of 7 July 1999, no person shall manufacture or import for use in industrial cleaning HCFC-141b or any product containing HCFC-141b. As of 1 January 2000, no person shall sell or offer for sale for industrial cleaning or use in industrial cleaning HCFC- 141b or any product containing HCFC-141b.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003

HCFC manufacture, use, sales and imports
As of 1 January 2010, no person shall manufacture, use, sell, offer for sale or import HCFC-141b, HCFC-142b or HCFC-22, except for exportation or for use as a refrigerant. Product ban: no person shall manufacture or import any product that contains or intends to contain HCFC-141b, HCFC-142b or HCFC-22. As of 1 January 2015, no person shall manufacture, use, sell, offer for sale or import any HCFC except for manufacture or import of HCFC for exportation or for use as a refrigerant before January 1, 2020, except for HCFC-123.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003

Transit shipments
The amended Ozone Depleting Substance controls transit shipment of HCFCs. Transit is considered to be a temporary import followed by an export (see examples) . To avoid the requirement of an import permit and an export permit for a shipment in transit, it has been decided to implement a notice for transit shipment. In accordance with the Regulations, a notice for transit shipment has to be provided, in the form approved by the Minister, at least 15 days prior to the import or export.
Source: Environment Canada, Stratospheric Ozone TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003


Czech Republic

New refrigeration equipment
Ban on HCFC for new installations and ban on import of HCFC systems.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003

Import taxes
Significantly increased the import tax on HCFCs from 1 June 2002.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003


Denmark

General use
Most HCFCs prohibited as of 1 June 1995, with the exception of certain uses phased out at later dates.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003

Foam manufacturing
HCFCs prohibited as of 1 January 1996 for production of jointing foam, rigid polyurethane, excluding insulating foam, flexible and rigid p/u integral foam, rigid P/U insulating foam for district heating pipes. HCFCs prohibited as of 1 January 2000 as mould release agents, production of flexible P/U with density <23 kg/m3, and uses in new commercial and industrial heat transfer systems and associated automatic equipment. HCFCs prohibited as of 1 January 2002 in production of rigid XPS and PU insulating foam for uses other than district heating pipes, uses in existing household, commercial and industrial heat transfer systems and associated automatic equipment, and uses in research, development and laboratories.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003

Refrigeration servicing
The Refrigerant Sector Environment Scheme (KMO) requires that all refrigerants must be recovered and recycled, including HCFCs. Only registered enterprises and/or individuals, who have the necessary knowledge and recovery equipment are allowed to purchase refrigerant.
Source: UNFCCC web site, Submissions from Parties to SBSTA, 23 September 1999. UNFCCC paper

According to national law, the Copenhagen community has adopted a regulation that entered into force by 1 July 1999 which requires leakage test for all larger refrigeration systems within the boundary of the municipality containing artificial refrigerants, i.e. CFC, HCFC, HFC and PFC. For HFC and PFC containing refrigeration systems the requirement is 2 checks per annum for systems containing less than 100 kg and 4 checks for systems containing more than 100 kg. For CFC and HCFC containing equipment the checks are more often.
Source: UNFCCC web site, Submissions from Parties to SBSTA, 23 September 1999. UNFCCC paper


European Union

Regulations

Regulation (EC) No 1005/2009 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16 September 2009 on substances that deplete the ozone layer. This Regulation replaces Regulation (EC) No 2037/2000.

Regulation (EC) 2037/2000 on ozone depleting substances, as amended, controls the production, importation, exportation, placing on the market, use, recovery, recycling, reclamation and destruction of all ozone-depleting substances including HCFCs. The regulation includes detailed reporting requirements for these substances and a legal basis for inspections and penalties whilst also foreseeing the inclusion of new substances into the control scheme. On 1 August 2008, the Commission presented a proposal for recasting and amending the regulation in force, which must be adopted by the European Parliament and the Council.
Source: EC DG Environment, Protection of the Ozone Layer web site EC DG Environment

After a review of Regulation (EC) No 2037/2000, which started at the end of 2006, the Commission presented a proposal on 1 August 2008 which recasts and amends the current legislation. The proposal seeks to change the current legislation in several ways, including bringing forward the production phase-out of HCFCs from 2025 to 2020 in line with the recent decision under the Montreal Protocol.
Source: EC DG Environment, Protection of the Ozone Layer web site EC DG Environment

Licensing system
Regulation (EC) 2037/2000 includes an electronic licensing system for imports and exports of ODS (including HCFCs), which also serves to prevent the illegal trade in ozone-depleting chemicals.
Source: EC DG Environment, Protection of the Ozone Layer web site EC DG Environment

Refrigerant use
Regulation (EC) 2037/2000 prohibits HCFC use for the following applications as of specific dates: Refrigeration, air conditioning and heat pumps in general as of 1 January 2001; Fixed air conditioning < 100kW as of 1 July 2002; Reversible air conditioning/heat pumps as of 1 January 2004; Servicing existing systems with virgin HCFCs as of 1 January 2010; Servicing existing systems with all HCFCs as of 1 January 2015
Source: EC DG Environment, Presentation at Ashgabat, Turkmenistan, 28 February 2007 EC DG Environment

Imports and exports
Regulation (EC) 2037/2000 controls import and exports of HCFCs. Imports of HCFCs are subject to limits. All imports are licensed by the Commission. Imports of products and equipment containing HCFCs are prohibited, unless they were produced before the use ban.
HCFC exports are permitted (except non-Party states). All export are authorised by Commission. Exports of HCFC equipment and products are permitted (but use of HCFCs banned for such exports on 31 Dec 2009).
Source: EC DG Environment, Presentation at Ashgabat, Turkmenistan, 28 February 2007 EC DG Environment

Monitoring, emission control and end of life
Regulation (EC) 2037/2000 requires: data reporting by producers, importers and exporters; annual checks for leaks; mandatory recovery of used HCFC from certain equipment; recovery if practicable from other products; recovered HCFCs to be recycled or destroyed;
mandatory training of persons handling HCFCs.
Source: EC DG Environment, Presentation at Ashgabat, Turkmenistan, 28 February 2007 EC DG Environment


Fiji

Act
The Ozone Depleting Substances Act No. 26 of 1998 and the and Ozone Depleting Substances Regulation 2000 regulates the importation, exportation, sale, storage and use of ozone depleting substances including HCFCs.
Source: Fiji Ozone Depleting Substances Act Fiji ODS Act

Phase out
No person shall import, export, store, dispose of, or manufacture HCFCs (whether virgin, recycled or in a mixture) with effect from 1 January 2031.
Source: Fiji Ozone Depleting Substances Act Fiji ODS Act


Finland

Foam manufacturing
HCFCs prohibited as of 1 January 1999 in the production of integral skin foams used for safety applications; and as a solvent for purposes in which the use of HCFC compounds has not yet been banned by the EU. Products and equipment containing the HCFC compounds in these applications may not be placed on the market.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003

Refrigerant use
HCFCs prohibited as of 1 January 2000 as refrigerants in equipment installed and manufactured after 31 December 1999 (unless such use has already been banned by the EU) and in the production of rigid insulating foams. Products and equipment containing the HCFC compounds in these applications may not be placed on the market.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003


France

The French legislation on refrigerants, in its European Union context, is described in this document (in French only)

This is the first report (2008) of the declarations to the French Observatory of refrigerants. Section 1 presents the regulatory context.

 


Germany

Aersol and packaging use
HCFC-22 prohibited in aerosols, packaging materials, foamed dishes and trays as of 1 August 1991.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003

Insulation foam use
HCFC-22 prohibited in construction foams as of 1 January 1993.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003

Refrigeration and foam use
Phase-out of HCFC-22 as of 1 January 2000 in new refrigeration and air conditioning equipment and all foam uses.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003

Phase out
Phase-out of all HCFCs required as of 1 January 2005.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003


Iceland

Refrigeration servicing
HCFC licenses for use of recycled HCFC-22 for servicing existing equipment.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003


India

Rules
The country controls HCFCs through the Ozone Depleting Substances (Regulation and Control) Rules 2000, which provides a comprehensive set of regulations to control and monitor production and use of ozone depleting substances in India.
Source: Ministry of Environment and Forests, Ozone Cell, The Montreal Protocol India's Success Story, 2008 India's Success Story

Imports and licensing
Under the Ozone Depleting Substances (Regulation and Control) Rules 2000, import of HCFCs is restricted (subject to licensing); import of HCFCs from non-Parties to the Montreal Protocol is prohibited; and import of equipment containing HCFCs is restricted (subject to licensing).
Source: Ministry of Environment and Forests, Ozone Cell, The Montreal Protocol India's Success Story, 2008 India's Success Story

New manufacturing installations
Under the Ozone Depleting Substances (Regulation and Control) Rules 2000, installation of new capacity to manufacture HCFCs is prohibited; expansion of existing capacity to manufacture HCFCs is prohibited.
Source: Ministry of Environment and Forests, Ozone Cell, The Montreal Protocol India's Success Story, 2008 India's Success Story

Registration of HCFC using enterprises
Registration is compulsory under the ODS Regulation and Control (Amendment) Rules, 2004. This amendment was issued so that all
enterprises using CTC and HCFC for manufacturing activities are required to register with the designated authority vide amendment
Rules, 2004 on or before 31 December, 2005. The rules were further amended on 18 September 2007. As per the amended rules, registration for all ODS will be open till 31December 2009 and the existing registered enterprises need not apply for renewal.
Source: Ministry of Environment and Forests, Ozone Cell, The Montreal Protocol India's Success Story, 2008 India's Success Story

HCFC phase out
The use of HCFCs as interim substitutes to replace CFCs is permitted up to 1 January 2030.
Source: Ministry of Environment and Forests, Ozone Cell, The Montreal Protocol India's Success Story, 2008 India's Success Story


Islamic Republic of Iran

Imports
Currently there are no regulations specifically addressing HCFCs. However, importers are required to complete a special form and provide it to customs before they can import HCFCs.
Source: UNEP DTIE OzonAction ROAP CAP team, March 2009


Italy

Fire extinguishants
For fire-fighting applications, products with a GWP>3400, with an ODP>0.065 and with an atmospheric lifetime of greater than 42 years are forbidden.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003

Use, import and production of certain HCFCs
As of 1 January 2000, use, import, and production of HCFCs with an ODP>0.065 (includes HCFC-141b) are banned.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003

HCFC phase out
Production, use, sale, import, and export of all HCFCs banned as of 1 January 2008.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003


Japan

Labelling
Labelling required for HCFC-containing commercial refrigeration equipment as of 1 April 2002.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003

Foam production and imports
Production and import of HCFC-141b for foam sector banned as of 1 January 2004.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003

Refrigerants
New HCFC-22 refrigerant banned as of 1 January 2010. HCFC-22 refrigerant (refill) banned as of 1 January 2020.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003

Solvents
HCFC-141b cleaning solvent banned as of 1 January 2010. HCFC-225 cleaning solvent banned as of 1 January 2020.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003

Foam
HCFC-142b foam are banned as of 1 January 2010.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003

Refrigeration equipment end of life
The Law for Recycling of Specified Home Appliances requires manufacturers of such home appliances as refrigerators and air conditionings to recycle the end-of -use appliances and to recover CFCs, HCFCs and HFCs as refrigerants. This law has been enforced since April 2001.
Source: UNFCCC web site, Japan submission to SBSTA 11th Session, 5-14 June 2002.

The Fluorocarbons Recovery and Destruction Law requires end-users of commercial refrigerators, chillers and air conditionings to have refrigerant CFCs, HCFCs and HFCs recovered by licensed recovery operators since April 2001. End-users of mobile air conditionings will be required by the law, to have their conditionings collected by licensed operators and accordingly to have CFC or HFC refrigerants recovered by licensed recovery operators after October 2002. Recovered fluorocarbons will be destroyed by licensed operators, or will be reused.
Source: UNFCCC web site, Japan submission to SBSTA 11th Session, 5-14 June 2002.


Mexico

Imports and trade
Mexican companies may trade HCFCs with countries specified in Articles 2 and 5 of the Montreal Protocol, since the obligation to begin prohibiting this trade does not enter into force until 2016. Beginning in that year, trade in HCFCs may only occur if countries have ratified the Copenhagen and Beijing amendments.
Source: Commission for Environmental Cooperation, ODS Policies and Regulations


Netherlands

Insulation materials
Production, trade, import and export of all HCFC insulation materials banned as of 1 January 1993.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003

Solvents
The use of HCFCs as solvents is only permitted if sufficient recapture takes place according to specific legislative requirements.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003

Refrigerant use
The use of HCFCs as refrigerants is only permitted if refrigeration equipment is leak-tight according to the technical legislative requirements for refrigeration equipment.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003

Refrigeration servicing
Maintenance and servicing of refrigeration equipment is only permitted by certified mechanics who are certified by the STEK-institute. Certificates are only issued when the mechanics are examined on theory and practice of the national requirements for refrigeration equipment.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003


Singapore

Phase out
Freeze production and consumption of HCFC by 1 Jan 2013; Reduce production and consumption of HCFC by 10% (of freeze quantity) by 1
Jan 2015; Reduce production and consumption of HCFC by 35% by 1 Jan 2020; Reduce production and consumption of HCFC by 67.5% by 1 Jan 2025, and Phase-out production and consumption of HCFC by 1 Jan 2030. After 1 Jan 2030, an annual average of 2.5% of freeze quantity of HCFCs is still allowed for servicing refrigeration and air conditioning equipment existing on 1 January 2030. This amount of HCFCs will be allowed for maintenance of existing inservice
equipment for the period 2030 – 2040. However, this is subject to review in 2025.
Source: Singapore National Environment Agency, Circular on Acceleration of Phase Out of HCFCs, 6 May 2008 Singapore NEA Circular


Spain

Refrigerator sales
Sales ban of all refrigerators with HCFC refrigerant or foam.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003


Sweden

Refrigeration servicing
Refrigerants Order and the Swedish Code of Practice recommends that only accredited enterprises may install or conduct any service or maintenance of refrigeration systems. Material and design of refrigeration and air-conditioning system shall be such that
leakage is minimized, maintenance is facilitated, refrigerant charge is minimized, refrigerants with smallest effect on ozone layer and climate is chosen. The refrigerants must be recovered or reclaimed for reuse or destruction. All equipment shall be subject to regular leak tests and controlled by accredited enterprises at least once a year.
Source: UNFCCC web site, Submissions from Parties to SBSTA, 23 September 1999. UNFCCC paper

Fire extinguisher handling
Swedish Fire Extinguisher Order Includes provisions for handling halons, HCFCs and HFCs (regular leak tests at least once a year, a record must be kept of leakages, only approved enterprises may handle fire extinguishing fluids, facilities containing more than 20 kg of fire extinguishing fluids must report annually to the Regional Authorities).
Source: UNFCCC web site, Submissions from Parties to SBSTA, 23 September 1999. UNFCCC paper

Insulation and refrigerant use
HCFCs may only be used for the manufacture of rigid foam plastics for insulation purposes as of 1 January 1994.
Source: UNFCCC web site, Submissions from Parties to SBSTA, 23 September 1999. UNFCCC paper

New equipment
Phase-out of HCFCs in new equipment as of 1 January 1998.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003

Refrigeration servicing
Phase-out of HCFCs for servicing existing equipment as of 1 January 2002.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003



Switzerland

Foam, new refrigeration and medical aerosols
Ban on HCFCs in rigid foam, new refrigeration (servicing permitted until 2010/15) and as medical aerosol.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003

Refrigeration servicing
Virgin HCFCs prohibited in maintenance and servicing of refrigeration and air-conditioning equipment as of 1 January 2010. Recycled HCFCs prohibited in maintenance and servicing as of 1 January 2015.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003


United Kingdom

Refrigerant recovery and recycling
It is mandatory in the UK for users of HCFCs in refrigeration units to recover and recycle HCFCs.
Source: UK Environment Agency web site UK Environment Agency

Solvents
There is some use of HCFCs as solvents although this use is being phased out (almost entirely banned in the UK from 2001). The UK Environment Agency categorises HCFCs as a hazardous Volatile Organic Compound (VOC).
Source: UK Environment Agency web site UK Environment Agency



United States of America

Regulations controlling HCFCs
The United States amended the Clean Air Act (CAA) in 1990 to include Title VI, Stratospheric Ozone Protection. The Montreal Protocol provided the basis for Title VI, which included additional requirements to phase out the production of substances that deplete the ozone layer. The U.S. has already phased out many substances and is now phasing out HCFCs (Class II substances) starting with those that have the greatest ozone depletion potential.
Source: US EPA Ozone Depletion web site US EPA Ozone Depletion

Baseline allowances, consumption and production caps
In 2003 EPA issued baseline allowances for production and import of HCFC-22 and HCFC-142b. EPA allocated 100 percent of the U.S. consumption and production caps by allocating both consumption and production allowances to individual companies for HCFC-141b, HCFC-22, and HCFC-142b.
Source: US EPA Ozone Depletion web site US EPA Ozone Depletion

Consumption
As of 1 January 2003, no domestic consumption of HCFC-141b allowed unless specifically authorized due to technical constraints (e.g. Space shuttle insulation foam). As of 1 January 2010, no domestic consumption of HCFC-142b and HCFC-22, except for use in equipment manufactured before 1/1/2010 (so no production or importing for new equipment that uses these refrigerants). As of 1 January 2015, no domestic consumption of any HCFCs, except for use as refrigerants in equipment manufactured before 1 January 2020; labelling of all HCFC products on (or before) this date. As of 1 January 2020, no domestic consumption of any HCFC-142b and HCFC-22 (refrigeration servicing tail).
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003

Production and imports
As of 1 January 2003, production and import of HCFC-141b, the HCFC with the highest ODP, are banned. As of 1 January 2010, the production and import of HCFC-22 and HCFC-142b will be banned except for on-going servicing needs in equipment manufactured before 1 January 2010.* As of 1 January 2015, production or import of HCFCs will be banned except where the HCFCs are used as a refrigerant in appliances manufactured prior to 1 January 2020. As of 1 January 2020, remaining production and import of HCFC-22 and HCFC-142b will be banned.* As of 1 January 2030, the remaining production and import of all other HCFCs will be banned.* [Note*: certain additional exemptions apply, including exemptions for (1) HCFCs used in processes resulting in their transformation or destruction, or (2) pre-authorized import of HCFCs that are recovered and either recycled or reclaimed.]
Source: US EPA Ozone Depletion web site US EPA Ozone Depletion

Interstate commerce and use
As of 1 January 2015, the introduction into interstate commerce or use of HCFCs will be banned except where the HCFCs are used as a refrigerant in appliances manufactured prior to 1 January 2020. Certain additional exemptions apply, including exemptions for (1) HCFCs used in processes resulting in their transformation or destruction, or (2) pre-authorized import of HCFCs that are recovered and either recycled or reclaimed.
Source: US EPA Ozone Depletion web site US EPA Ozone Depletion

Aerosol and foam products
All aerosol products, pressurized dispensers and foam products containing, or manufactured with HCFCs - except those specifically exempted by the regulations and those that are listed as essential medical devices by the Food and Drug Administration, at 21 CFR 2.125(e) -- are banned from sale and distribution. Exempted products include: wasp and hornet sprays near high-tension power lines; solvents - lubricants, coatings, or cleaning fluids for aircraft maintenance and electrical, electronic or photographic equipment; solvents and propellants - mold release agents, document preservation sprays, spinnerette lubricant/cleaning sprays; fire suppression - portable fire extinguishers in non-residential applications; foam - closed cell insulation foam and integral skin foam for motor vehicle safety. This regulation was in force from 1 January 1994 until 1996.
Source: TEAP HCFC Task Force Report, May 2003, Annex 2 HCFC Control Measures TEAP HCFC Task Force  Report May 2003


Acknowledgements:
Thanks to Pierre Olivier for contributing to this compilation.

  
© UNEP DTIE 2007 | updated 12-feb-10